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Infographic Of The Day: Which Country Could Make You Happiest?

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If you live in America, it’s relatively easy to imagine how different life would be in Haiti. It would be pretty bad. But the difference between living in New York as opposed to, say, Stockholm, is harder to quantify. Once you’re in the developed world, the quality of life and technological advances are basically uniform. So how would you decide which country would make you happiest?

The Organisation of Economic Development (basically the most developed countries in Europe and Asia) has a new interactive chart of its Better Life Index that lets you compare countries based on more bourgeoisie-friendly statistics than the usual GDP or maternal mortality.

Each flower represents an OECD member country and each petal represents how it scores — out of 10 — on each of the 11 indices, including jobs, work-life balance, and community. You can rank the countries based on what issues you care about most. For instance, let’s imagine you care a lot about work-life balance and income, but don’t care at all about safety or the environment:

Pack your bags and move to Luxembourg. The country scores incredibly high in the income index (10 out of 10; the U.S. is second at a mere 6.5) and a medium score in work-life balance, which pushes it to the top, too. It also has a great environment score, but we decided not to care about that. Curious about a specific country? You can also zoom in to get specifics. Greece, for instance, is very safe (8.6 out of 10) and fairly healthy (7.3 out of 10), though its economic troubles make it less desirable in most of the work-related categories:

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Where’s the best life? It really depends on what you want. All factors being equal, Australia and Canada rank the highest. But beware, their income scores are actually fairly low. You might make up for not making much money because all the rest of life is so peachy. But if it’s just money you care about, try Luxembourg. At the end of the day, though, Denmark might be the best choice: It ranks the highest in terms of both work-life balance and general life satisfaction. What more could you want?

[Top image by Scarleth White]

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About the author

Morgan is a senior editor at Fast Company. He edits the Ideas section, formerly FastCoExist.com.

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