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  • 10.11.10

Health 2.0 Causes Industry Shift in Five Years

Since December 2006, when Matthew Holt and Indu Subiya almost single-handedly began the Health 2.0 movement with Matthew’s blog and their first conference, the entire world of health care has begun to change. And that’s not a simple thing to achieve. Health care is steeped in tradition, regulation, disparate moving parts, and territorial entities (witness the issues involved in health insurance reform).

Since December 2006, when Matthew Holt and Indu Subiya almost single-handedly began the Health 2.0 movement with Matthew’s blog and their first conference, the entire world of health care has begun to change. And that’s not a simple thing to achieve. Health care is steeped in tradition, regulation, disparate moving parts, and territorial entities (witness the issues involved in health insurance reform). But Matthew and Indu did not shift the system the way President Obama and Congress tried to do, through “push marketing.” Rather, they decided to harness the grass roots “pull” brought about by patients and the Web to force movement of the inertial forces.

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They took what was already happening–patient empowerment through online communities and early health information sites such as Medscape for physicians and WebMD for patients, and accelerated it by evangelizing patient engagement and empowerment, the prototyping of new technologies, and the shift of responsibility from the doctor to the doctor-patient partnership.

DiabetesMine

These developed into patient communities so successful that they formed partnerships with the pharmaceutical industry, which was the first segment of the industry to come aboard, seeing an opportunity to market drugs to patients. Ironically, the pharmaceutical industry now takes the aggregated information from patients and uses it in drug discovery and development as well: a site like Iguard.org, a service that alerts patients to drug safety information, new research about interactions, and recalls, is now a pharmaceutical industry reference for information on what the “user experience” actually is for drugs that have already been approved.

Practice Fusion
KevinMD

In fact, at the urging of both doctors and patients (do you think doctors like to be trapped in their offices all day?), health care is moving out of the office and the hospital to where the patients are. A new series of startups are enabling a far different doctor patient relationship, free of the traditional physical and emotional distance between the participants.

Mytrus

The last of the categories that interested me were the ones that created transparency around what medical services cost, and included a startup that shed light on what different physicians in a given geographical area charged for similar procedures, allowing a patient to comparison shop for doctors according to whatever criteria are most important to that patient (cost, convenience, credentials).

These new companies are looking ahead to health care reform. You will be seeing more of them.

About the author

Francine Hardaway, Ph.D is a serial entrepreneur and seasoned communications strategist. She co-founded Stealthmode Partners, an accelerator and advocate for entrepreneurs in technology and health care, in 1998.

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