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Sony Drops Out of Climate Change Campaign After Exploding Kids Ad

exploding kids ad

A PSA about climate change featuring exploding children and airborne body parts isn't something that corporations want to be associated with, apparently. The ad, narrated by former X-Files star Gillian Anderson (and displayed below), is part of the 10:10 global campaign to cut carbon emissions by 10% each year. The violent nature of the video so incensed Sony U.K. that the company dropped all support for the campaign.

Sony isn't the only company to condemn the ad. Kyocera called the gory video "a grave error" of judgment, though it hasn't gone so far as to disassociate itself completely from the campaign.

Sony expressed its disapproval in a statement, explaining that it "condemned the release by 10:10, the climate change campaign group, of a video entitled ’No Pressure’ that Sony considers to be ill-conceived and tasteless...[This] video risks undermining the work of the many thousands of members of the public, schools and universities, local authorities and many businesses, of which Sony is one, who support the long-term aims of the 10:10 movement and are actively working towards the reduction of carbon emissions."

Harsh words for a campaign that has been planned for the past year—and which culminates in four days on October 10th, a global "Day of Doing" for the planet. The 10:10 campaign has, of course, realized that the video is a mistake. Eugenie Harvey, the director of 10:10 U.K. issued a statement apologizing for the ad, which is no longer available on the 10:10 website.

But it's too late. The video has already been unleashed into the digital wild, where climate change skeptics and 10:10 campaign supporters alike can be found seething in disapproval. Let this be a lesson for future climate change campaigns: don't get too radical, or you'll lose all support from mainstream corporations and supporters.

Ariel Schwartz can be reached on Twitter or by email.

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