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iFive: Apple’s Future iPhones, Silicon Valley Fail, Browser and Mobile Gaming, Web R.I.P., Twitter Tales

There’s no “No” in innovation. Oh…

While you were sleeping, innovation was switching to camera 2 as one of its colleagues flipped it the bird live on teevee.

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1. Liquid metal: discuss. It’s exactly what it sounds like, and it’s been licensed by Apple–and, according to Leander Kahney, we’ll see a future iPhone made entirely of the material, as the firm has been making prototypes for Apple for the past two years. As ever with Apple, who has just been awarded patents for two of its iPhone features, the emphasis is on the future, and TechCrunch has a hint of what the iPhone 5 might be able to do–so that’s why the NFC dude was hired.

2.There’s a persuasive piece on GigaOm by former Gartner analyst Vinnie Mirchandani, who claims that Silicon Valley has “gone Hollywood.” By that, he means that it’s focusing on consumer products, rather than the more complex technology. As a result, “complex innovation is moving overseas”–to Germany and China. And, with investment in iPhone and iPad apps up by 220%, according to ReadWriteWeb, you could say he’s got a point.

3. Halo, Crackdown 2, and Guitar Hero 5 are just some of the games available to Windows Phone 7 users. The launch of the OS is a “major gaming mobile platform” for the firm. And from mobile to browser gaming. Google execs unveiled the future of Chrome gaming, which will have its very own Chrome app store for online games. And it’s good for developers. No approval process, and a 5% processing fee, rather than a share of the revenue. Finally, PlayStation 3 now comes in a larger capacity. Rejoice.

4. Zomigod, have you heard? The Web is dead. The physician taking the victim’s pulse is Wired magazine, which proclaims that it’s all about the Internet now. But perhaps some people still think it’s all about the printed word–see Rupert Murdoch’s $1 million donation to the Republican party, a pro-Town Crier body if ever there was one.

5. One week after Google debuted its Google Stories blog, a direct crib of Facebook’s equivalent, Twitter has gone and done the same. This time, it’s called Twitter Tales. Ah, a modicum of originality. To this end, Fast Company would like to announce that we too are launching a similar service. You can find it at www.fastcompany.com.

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About the author

My writing career has taken me all round the houses over the past decade and a half--from grumpy teens and hungover rock bands in the U.K., where I was born, via celebrity interviews, health, tech and fashion in Madrid and Paris, before returning to London, where I now live. For the past five years I've been writing about technology and innovation for U.S

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