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See Chrysler’s Follow-Up To The Super Bowl Hit, “It’s Halftime In America”

A new series of spots continues the can’t-keep-us-down theme of “Halftime,” and incorporates Chrysler brands into the comeback stories.

See Chrysler’s Follow-Up To The Super Bowl Hit, “It’s Halftime In America”

Chrysler snuck up on Super Bowl audiences this year and landed a knockout with “It’s Halftime In America,” a paean to American resilience starring Clint Eastwood.

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The spot, which addressed tough times in America and concluded with the promise that the country would get back on its feet and that the world would “hear the roar of our engines,” was a media sensation, transcending the Super Bowl discussion and becoming a political football. The ad was an extension of a marketing push that started a year earlier with the Super Bowl launch of the “Imported From Detroit” campaign. The campaign, created by Wieden + Kennedy Portland, kicked off with a Motor City-centric spot featuring Eminem and continued through the year with ads focused on themes of rebuilding, integrity, and, of course, Detroit.

Now, the automaker continues down that road with a new series of ads from W+K launching this weekend. Instead of a steely superstar, these spots feature the stories of everyday people challenged by the aforementioned tough times. Here though, Chrysler vehicles are more directly woven into the ad narratives. In fact, each spot is named for a Chrysler product: “Shaun in the Challenger”; “Jenny in the Jeep Wrangler”; “Tommy and the Ram”; and “300 My Son Steven.”

In the Ram spot here, a woman leaves a message for her husband, referring to his can-do “where there’s a truck, there’s a job” spirit.

The spots were created and produced at the same time as “Halftime,” which featured glimpses of footage from the new spots. The spots will roll out this weekend during high-profile TV shows and on Chrysler’s YouTube channel.

About the author

Teressa Iezzi is the editor of Co.Create. She was previously the editor of Advertising Age’s Creativity, covering all things creative in the brand world.

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