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GoPano, EPIC RED, Tanlines Add Up To 360-Degree Indie Music Experience

Brooklyn band Tanline’s video for their first single is an innovative experience that you’ll just have to click to believe.

GoPano, EPIC RED, Tanlines Add Up To 360-Degree Indie Music Experience

Click play on the clip for “Brothers” from Brooklyn band Tanlines and you’re invited into a cozy apartment where lead singer Eric Emm will croon the tune just for you from the comfort a shabby white couch. Click play and drag your cursor, however, and the video that seemed like just your average performance piece becomes an interactive experience that gives you a 360-degree, voyeuristic view of the action inside the apartment, replete with a cameo from a food delivery guy and the indie duo moseying about playing instruments.

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The video is directed by Alex Goldberg, Ben Schechter, and Drew Blatman, collectively known as Weird Days. Blatman says when Tanlines approached the group with the idea of creating a 360-degree music video using GoPano’s 360 technology, he knew he and his crew wanted to create something innovative yet simplistic. “We wanted to balance that line without being too gimmicky,” he says. “We wanted to do something that would certainly catch your interest but was still simple and matched the vibe of the band.”

And it was the combination of GoPano’s specialized lens attachment and an EPIC RED camera that allowed the guys from Weird Days to do just that. Essentially, the GoPano device is a mirrored ball that attaches to the lens of a camera pointed upwards to capture 360-degrees. Blatman says they opted to rent an EPIC RED camera so as not to compromise video quality for such a unique filming technique. “After you shoot, you basically have a giant circle that has the entire image on it. And what you have to do is run it through GoPano’s VideoWarp Director program that unravels it so you can actually edit it,” he says. “ Because we shot it on the RED and because we were using this process it took hours to look at one take.” Viewers can also watch the video on their iPhones using the GoPano app.

Ironically enough, Blatman and his fellow directors couldn’t even be in the room while filming given GoPano’s omnipresent technology. “We were hidden behind couches, the TV and in the other room,” he says. “Once we hit record we had to get out of the way and cross our fingers that the take would come together.”

Click play and sweep your cursor a tad to the right toward the piano and you can see Blatman wasn’t lying!

About the author

KC covers entertainment and pop culture for Fast Company. Previously, KC was part of the Emmy Award-winning team at "Good Morning America" where he was the social media producer.

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