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“The Great American Cereal Book” Takes Us Back

A trip through sweet, surreal cereal history.

“The Great American Cereal Book” Takes Us Back
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The smell of fresh cut grass and your parents’ continuing emotional unavailability aside, surely few things are as evocative of childhood as the colorful assault on the senses (and, in some cases, ethics) that is a cereal box. Particularly a box containing a sugar-packed nutritional disaster and tied in with a media property or toy (at Co.Create, we were Fruit Loops fans, though we were only allowed to have them on rare occasions).

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Of course marketing crappy food to children and nutritionally void cereals themselves are more and more frowned upon, but the Great American Cereal Book captures a greatest hits of cereal box creativity from a simpler time. For all its puff, cereal is a big business–third behind fizzy drinks and milk in supermarket spending, according to the book–and cereal boxes were nothing if not genius little representations of the media/advertising/big food industrial complex aimed at children.

The book, from Marty Gitlin and Topher Ellis showcases 350 packages and ads from brands like Cheerios, Cocoa Puffs, Trix and many others and provides insight into their creation. A few images below. Head to Juxtapoz for more.

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About the author

Teressa Iezzi is the editor of Co.Create. She was previously the editor of Advertising Age’s Creativity, covering all things creative in the brand world

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