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A Map Of New York’s Most Dangerous Intersections

Bikers and walkers know what intersections feel the most like death traps, but CrashStat, a new online map, shows exactly what places to avoid.

A Map Of New York’s Most Dangerous Intersections
Flickr user Velo Steve

You probably have some idea of the most dangerous intersections in your neighborhood–maybe one street is legendary for being perilous to cyclists, and maybe another is known as a dicey place for pedestrians to cross. But in big cities, not every dangerous intersection is obvious. Hence the need for CrashStat, a site that maps the scariest intersections in New York City.The site, a project of Transportation Alternatives, relies on data from the New York State Department of Transportation, which has data for every crash involving a cyclist or pedestrian dating back to 1995. The site allows users to search for crashes by an array of factors–location, crash details (pedestrian or cyclist injuries and fatalities), age, sex, what kind of motorist was involved, and contributing factors (i.e. driver illness, unsafe speed, and driver inexperience).

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Brooklynites can rest (somewhat) easy, according to CrashStat. Eight out of 10 of the most dangerous intersections for pedestrians are in Manhattan, and all of the 10 most perilous intersections for cyclists are in the borough. Still, the most deadly intersection by far is at Eastern Parkway and Utica Avenue in Brooklyn, with a total of 141 crashes and six deaths since 1995.

Manhattan’s Canal street is not a smart place to be if you’re on a bike.

There is some heartening news. As Transportation Nation points out, many intersections are getting safer over time, thanks to better street designs and traffic fixes. The number of cyclists in the city has also been increasing–and as the population of cyclists goes up, the number of cyclists hit by cars goes down.

CrashStat is a boon to New York City pedestrians and cyclists; having a comprehensive public map of crash statistics is a step (or should that be pedal?) toward making the city safer for alternative forms of transportation. So when will CrashStat expand to other major U.S. cities?<

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About the author

Ariel Schwartz is a Senior Editor at Co.Exist. She has contributed to SF Weekly, Popular Science, Inhabitat, Greenbiz, NBC Bay Area, GOOD Magazine and more

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