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The Most Interesting Man Once Threw a Party So Exclusive Even He Wasn’t There

You know who he is. Right now, he’s probably luging Mount Everest or quail hunting in Tunisia. He is the only man alive able to tweet 141 characters. Once, he saw a quadruple rainbow and hiked on, unimpressed. He is…The Most Interesting Man in the World. And last night, he threw a party.

The Most Interesting Man Once Threw a Party So Exclusive Even He Wasn’t There

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You know who he is. Right now, he’s probably luging Mount Everest or quail hunting in Tunisia. He is the only man alive able to tweet 141 characters. Once, he saw a quadruple rainbow and hiked on, unimpressed. He is…The Most Interesting Man in the World. And last night, he threw a party.

As legend has it, the Dos Equis frontman “jettisoned his belongings” after his personal aircraft malfunctioned during a “routine circumnavigation of the world.” Of course, it is “well known that the Most Interesting Man is a collector of priceless artifacts,” and these items must be found. Called the Most Interesting Cargo Hunt, the Dos Equis-sponsored event was based entirely around this story, and like his perfectly crafted lines, every detail of the gathering was fine-tuned. It serves as an innovative example of how viral marketing has legs beyond social media and other traditional avenues.

Let’s start with the invitation:

Perfect. Even if you were not invited to the event, the invitation itself doesn’t require context–it’s awesome in its own right. “If you’re anything like me, you undoubtedly have a jai alai tournament, embassy party, and swimsuit competition to judge,” his message reads. Dos Equis should seriously consider starting a newsletter–just receiving a message in my inbox “from the desk of the Most Interesting Man in the World” makes me start to question the Old Spice man’s panache and prowess.

The Cargo Hunt itself was everything promised. Hidden floors beneath the Hudson Hotel in New York City, crates and palm trees were strewn throughout the venue. Safari guides led guests throughout the space and tasked them with completing various challenges à la Indiana Jones. For example, a pool filled with non-newtonian fluid, a substance that is a liquid but will convert into a solid temporarily once pressure is applied, served as the Quick “Sand” pit. Partygoers rolled up their trousers and risked dunking in a tub of tar to complete the task. (I witnessed one brave soul who slipped racing across the pool and slid off the stage, crashing into several crates. Thankfully, we all had signed liability wavers.)

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And that’s not to mention the rock climbing challenge or bug pit, where blindfolded guests had to reach into a box filled with cockroaches and maggots to fish out treasures.

Only via augmented reality could partygoers decode labels on The Most Interesting Man’s various cargo crates (reality is augmented by him). Holding the QR codes up to a screen, clues would pop up, enabling guests to crack the puzzles.

Those who completed all of the challenges were eligible to win an undisclosed grand prize. Event planners promised treasures beyond one’s wildest dreams.

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But I just hoped it’d be a few seconds with the Most Interesting Man in the World. Or this painting, which I more than once tried to steal:

Turns out, he wasn’t there. But the grand prize was a trip to Mexico, where the winner will serve as the Most Interesting Man’s photojournalist–obviously the most sought-after job in the world. Head to Guest of a Guest to check out more pictures from the affair.

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About the author

Austin Carr writes about design and technology for Fast Company magazine.

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