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The Future Perfect’s Debut Collection Is All Grown-Up

To celebrate its 10th anniversary, the quirky design boutique rolls out its first furniture line.

A decade after The Future Perfect put an early, ironic stake in the ground in the Brooklyn design scene, the Williamsburg boutique is coming of age. Founder David Alhadeff first expanded to an outpost in Manhattan, and then to San Francisco this past March. For fans familiar with their collection of parody-laced housewares–including couches shaped like magic carpets and dressers disguised as stacks of firewood–the store’s 10-year anniversary debut collection might raise a few eyebrows.

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While Alhadeff says the line is “but a twinkle in the night sky of what’s to come,” the goal for the collection was more about showcasing the talents of four choice TFP designers than it was geared toward a pivot for the brand. “The pieces themselves weren’t selected so much as the designers were; thus, the collection has the feeling of four individuals doing their own thing,” Alhadeff tells Co.Design.

That group includes Lindsey Adelman, Jason Miller, Russell Pinch (each of whom designed one of the furniture pieces), and Charles de Lisle, who created the branchlike chandelier. The furniture may not all belong in the same room, but each piece delivers a dose of sober nostalgia to the store so well known for its indie edge. In particular, the Kent sofa from Miller evokes the clean, square silhouettes of midcentury modern furniture.

It turns out, there’s a method behind crafting a private label collection that doesn’t quite jive with the quirkier new merchandise: “It was incredibly important that we create a collection that is of heirloom quality,” Adelhoff says. “Materials had to be long-lasting. Craftsmanship was paramount. The collection hopefully expresses a commitment to create enduring, hand-crafted work that’s respectful of the environment and honest in its use of materials.”

The sparse, understated signature line could be a harbinger for a more austere future for the boutique. Or perhaps it’s designed as an anchor for the rest of The Future Perfect’s ideal home. After all, those bubble-shaped lamps and animal-themed throw pillows will need a backdrop.

Shop The Future Perfect’s new collection here.

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About the author

Margaret Rhodes is a former associate editor for Fast Company magazine.

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