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High-Design Rugs Featuring Sci-Fi Bugs

Insects found in the house often meet a bummer of a fate: crumpled into a tissue, squashed under a shoe, sucked into a Dustbuster, or (my kind-hearted strategy) trapped under a glass cup and then thrown out into the garden.

Entomologists treat their subjects with far more reverence and respect, but even the most avid enthusiast has got to really, really dig ’em to spring for Lanzavecchia + Wai‘s new Mutazoni rug series for Milan-based brand Nodus. Though they’d always be underfoot, there’s no stomping out these genuinely beautiful creepy crawlies.

Despite the realistic detailing, the two species featured on the wool and bamboo silk coverings are actually fictitious; Tacua Fukushimae and Amaurodes Chernobilis were completely imagined by the Italian and Singaporean duo, each as if they were the result of severe radiation exposure from the respective disasters that gave them their names. The designers cite the work of Cornelia Hesse-Honegger as particularly inspiring, and it’s not difficult to see why. The scientific illustrator has been documenting deformed specimens for decades–her drawings of wilted wings, disjointed abdomens, and malformed feelers are all directly affected by nuclear fallout.

Look closely at the beetle and cicada depicted and you can see that they’re not symmetrical. Nature, after having been irrevocably altered by man, is given an artistic treatment. It takes a little while to spot all the differences from one side to the other, but it’s something straight out of a sci-fi story–except in that tale they’d probably come to life and devour your family, or enact some strange Kafka-meets-Mothra-meets-The-Fly scenario. What would Jeff Goldblum do?

Click through to the Nodus site for more information on Tacua Fukushimae and Amaurodes Chernobilis and request a quote.

(h/t designboom)

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