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Behold, The Very First Documentary Shot With Google Goggles

It’s a new era for first-person documentaries and celebrity/geek synergy.

Remember when we said that Google Glass needed Gucci and Prada to reinvent its tech as cool? Well, apparently they took the advice pretty literally.

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They’ve just revealed the first, first-person documentary (short) shot through Google Glass, and it’s from the perspective of famous fashion designer Diane von Furstenberg, during her hectic Sunday at New York Fashion Week. The most remarkable thing you’ll notice is just that it works very, very well. No doubt, it’s a selectively edited short, but the images are stable, natural and, above all, extremely personal. Whatever precise engineering mojo Google is working with lens width, video codecs and image stabilization is working better than an iPhone camera strapped to someone’s head. And as for von Furstenberg, who was she to complain about the Google-backed cameo? “I felt completely free and totally unaware that I was filming or being recorded,” she tells Co.Design. “It therefore feels very true and intimate.”


It’s not difficult to project where Google can take this approach. They debuted the Glass technology by strapping it onto a skydiver’s head. Now they’ve handed Glass to a designer for a more in-depth experiment. Don’t be surprised to see many Glass documentaries unfold through the eyes of increasingly large tastemakers and celebrities. Watch an NFL game through the eyes of a quarterback, or a rock concert from the perspective of the lead singer. It’s a deal that will work for everyone.

Celebrities develop an intimate, online media presence that dwarfs the fidelity of Twitter, promoted by the most connected company in the world. Google makes Glass cool. (Though, if I may be so bold, Glass could still use a line of designer frames.)

See more here.

[Hat tip: Fast Company]

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About the author

Mark Wilson is a senior writer at Fast Company who has written about design, technology, and culture for almost 15 years. His work has appeared at Gizmodo, Kotaku, PopMech, PopSci, Esquire, American Photo and Lucky Peach

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