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A Collection Of Lanterns Made Using An Ancient Japanese Craft

Resembling sea urchins plucked from the deep, these lanterns are in fact made from fabric that has been twisted, compressed, and bound into precise patterns using shibori, a traditional Japanese technique much like tie-dyeing. The results are sculpted shades that marry a 400-year-old tradition with modern lighting forms.

The lamps are produced by Suzusan, a German company headed by Hiroyuki Murase, who originally moved to Europe to study sculpture at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf and began importing fabrics hand-made by his family in Japan to sell as scarves. That business eventually expanded to include luminaires: “The idea was to present the refined tridimensional fabrics as artworks of light,” Murase writes.

Each handcrafted shade is one of a kind and comes in a variety of versions, including pendant and floor-standing models, and four distinctive patterns. Best of all, the polyester sculptures don’t have to be handled with kid gloves. They’ve been heat-treated to keep their shape and can be thrown into the washing machine for cleaning.

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