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Watch: A Charming Stop-Motion Video, Lambasting Our Internet Obsession

Neta Cohen goes analog for her graduation project from Bezalel Academy of Art and Design.

Our focus these days is all kinds of fractured, and attentions are, more often than not, completely torn. Neta Cohen tackled the trappings of modern life in Tap to Retry, her graduation project at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design. The increasingly frenetic series of super-shorts are meant as “metaphors for the way we conduct ourselves in this hectic era of information overload,” she tells Co.Design. “I wanted to give a perceptible interpretation to vague, undefined concepts, but in a way that will only add to the disorientation we all feel at times living in a world where real and virtual constantly mix and shift.”

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Though Cohen had never actually experimented with stop motion before, it offered a chance to unite what she found to be her “main passions”–creating tangible objects and motion graphics for the screen–while still a student and, therefore, her own client. After a bit of trial and error figuring out the finer points of the medium–specifically how to locate, light, shoot, and animate the objects–Cohen began what would be the four-month-long process of putting it all together, using her own living room as studio and dining table as set. “I decided to do about 30 different scenes in order to emphasize the ADHD feeling of the piece, and give it characteristics of a really long series of YouTube clips,” she says.

Planning and constructing the ephemera was tedious–“I completely disabled our house, and probably our lives,” she says–but proved to be incredibly rewarding. “Seeing pieces of paper and piles of static shots turn into something with a life of its own was quite magical.” Composer and sound designer, Markey Funk, and her “gifted and unbelievably patient” animator boyfriend, Lior Ben Horin, helped out with the music and editing in the final stretch. And though the effort will forever live on in the video, she kept some souvenirs from the epic creative journey. “Many of the models were destroyed during the shoots,” she says. “The ‘remains’ are stored in shoe boxes under the desk in our study, and a few lucky survivors are placed proudly on a shelf next to the TV.”

(H/T Laughing Squid)

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