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A Toothbrush That Makes Rinsing Super Easy

Suck on this, faucets.

It’s the great equalizer. Even the world’s richest monarchs–with their gold-gilded sinks and ivory toothbrushes tipped with the coarse tail fur of DNA-recombinated duck-billed platypuses–face the same problem every day. We all brush our teeth, and with a frothy mouth full of mint or bubblegum, debate whether to leave a fluoride-laden rabies bite on the nearest cup, or simply crane our neck under the sink faucet. But a new invention will change everything.

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The Rinser Toothbrush ($22 in November), by Scott Amron, channels faucet water through its body, spraying it into the air like a fountain, where it can be sipped and swished with ease.

“I’ve wanted to create a true ‘invention’ in the modern sense of the word, for forever,” Amron tells Co.Design. “An advance in the art, part novelty, part get rich quick scheme, obsessively designed and compulsively engineered, an opportunity to go up against the big guys like P&G and Johnson & Johnson with nothing more than a vision of how you see things going. All for an idea that borders on both necessity and absurdity.”

The Rinser Toothbrush is definitely a bit silly. Why, I can’t really put my finger on. But the first time I watched the embedded clip, I giggled just a little–maybe because the idea works a little too well, the tacit result of someone taking a mundane problem very, very seriously and solving it with flourish. Design overkill, if you will.

Because despite building the first working prototype in just 10 minutes, Amron spent the next six years getting the flow just right, developing a design that could accommodate for a variety of water pressure and aeration, that could turn a faucet’s downward torrent into an elegant arc of H2O.

“I spent countless hours over a sink trying to get the water to jump right,” Amron admits. “I consulted with fluid dynamics engineers and professors to no avail. I tried everything. I spent so much time over a sink that I can now make falling tap water jump into a fountain curiously well with just my hand.

“Now water pressure and aeration are no longer an issue. It uses very little water and manages to jet higher than the faucet with beautifully slow laminar flow.”

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At the moment, the Rinser Toothbrush is on pre-order for $22. And honestly, despite a modular replaceable bristle head, that’s probably a bit too expensive to attract the impulse buy of a perfectly designed novelty product. Then again, for those of us already brushing with pricey platypus fur, price is really no object.

Order it here.

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About the author

Mark Wilson is a senior writer at Fast Company. He started Philanthroper.com, a simple way to give back every day

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