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Reinvented Clothes Hanger Won’t Ruin Your Necklines

Ziba introduces perhaps the most dramatic rethink of the hanger in over a century.

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The basic shape of the clothes hanger–a flattened triangle with a hook–hasn’t changed much in over a hundred years. It’s perfectly serviceable for jackets and button-up shirts but fails miserably when it comes to T-shirts and crewneck sweaters, stretching and deforming their collars. Why hasn’t someone redesigned the hanger already?

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Finally, someone has: Mehdi Mojtabavi, an industrial designer at Portland-based Ziba, ditched the rigid model and developed a hanger made from two polypropylene parts: a hook attached to a flexible cross-piece that, when squeezed with one hand, collapses to slip gently through a neck hole before releasing to support the garment’s shoulders. The concept won an IDSA award in 2008, and Ziba has since built a patent-pending prototype.

The studio is looking for a manufacturing partner or licensee and estimates that Eslimi won’t cost any more to produce than the nicer hangers one might find at a housewares store. “It’s the sort of thing that looks obvious once you’ve sort of built it,” says Ziba’s senior writer, Carl Alviani. “And that’s basically how you know that it’s a beautiful solution.”

About the author

A former editor at such publications as WIRED, Bloomberg Businessweek, and Fast Company, Belinda Lanks has also written for The New York Times Magazine, The New York Observer, Interior Design, and ARTnews.

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