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The Week That Was: “To Live Happily Ever After, You Have To Make Magic And Sell It.”

We take management lessons from Jack And The Beanstalk, report on NASA colonies that never were, and learn that KLM wants to turn airplanes into singles clubs. It’s our top stories of the week!

The Week That Was: “To Live Happily Ever After, You Have To Make Magic And Sell It.”

What “Jack And The Beanstalk” Can Teach You About Pitching Clients. “It’s not enough to make magic. You have to sell it, too, if you want to live happily ever after.” –Brian Millar, strategy director, Sense Worldwide.

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NASA’s Psychedelic Concepts From The 1970s Are Still Inspiring Today. Suburban tract houses in a rainbow-colored wormhole floating through the cosmos? Sold.

Get Ready: The National Mall Is Leaping Into The 21st Century. Lots of great ideas here for sprucing up America’s front yard.

4 Ways To Keep Great Ideas From Getting Stuck In The Pipeline. “Although all innovators know the value of piloting, truly savvy innovators are explicit about the goals of their pilots.”–Smart Design’s Gordon Hui.

KLM Lets You Choose Seatmates Based On Facebook And LinkedIn Profiles. In other words, KLM is turning the airplane into a singles club… where people kick each other’s seatbacks and fart in their sleep. Zexxy.

Ikea’s Biggest Product Launch In Years: A TV, Sound System, And Blu-ray Player. “Technology is so much a part of our everyday life that we don’t need to see it as a separate technical product. The electronics don’t need to look technical anymore.”–Ikea’s Francis Cayouette.

4 Key Insights From The 57-Day, Blitzkrieg Redesign Of Google+. “You want to build an environment that’s friendly. …You want it to be a space where people can share things that are good and bad. If someone wants to come on and share that their mom or dad has cancer, it has to work for that.”–Google+ lead designer Fred Gilbert.

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What Both MBAs And MFAs Get Wrong About Solving Business Problems. “With only 15 minutes to convince a skeptical panel of experienced professionals about a new idea that doesn’t exist in the world today, [designers][/designers] fared significantly better than their MBA counterparts. Why? Because they shared real user insights to engage us emotionally, used narrative and stories to compel us, drew sketches and visualizations to inspire us, and simplified the complex to focus us.”–Doblin’s Melissa Quinn.

Kate Aronowitz, Facebook’s Design Director, On Crafting A Design-Led Organization. Aronowitz went from Photoshopping ads on male models for muscle magazines to hopping between some of Silicon Valley’s most admired startups, including eBay, LinkedIn, and Facebook.

Incredible Camera Takes Photos With Your Fingers. “As great as our clever tools may be, we don’t use a fork to pick our noses for a reason: Our fingers will always feel a whole lot better than anything else.”

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About the author

Suzanne LaBarre is the editor of Co.Design. Previously, she was the online content director of Popular Science and has written for the New York Times, the New York Observer, Newsday, I.D

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