advertisement
advertisement

Watch This Machine Blow Bubbles The Size Of A Sofa

Finally, a machine designed solely for the mass manufacture of giant bubbles.

advertisement
advertisement

Why do we ever stop blowing bubbles? The act is a gorgeously transient magic trick that never gets any less enjoyable.

advertisement

Bubble Device, by artist Nicholas Hanna, is an epic celebration of bubbles. It’s a simple, computer-powered frame that manufacturers huge, soapy orbs. “I thought it would be interesting to explore the continuous, automated production of something fragile and temporal,” Hanna tells Co.Design. “I find beauty and poetry in the aesthetics of the assembly line, and this project is an investigation in that direction.”

There is something beautiful about this rigid wooden frame, outputting such wobbly, tenuous spheres time and time again. And while Hanna doesn’t come out and say it, Bubble Device is a bit of a dark analog to our own industrial production system.

In a seemingly effortless fashion, our factories output endless amounts of shiny new products. Yet however much we may pay for them–especially in the realm of electronics–these new things are only slightly more permanent than a bubble. They either break or become obsolete quickly, requiring another wave of manufacturing to produce another bubble. (And the cycle can only repeat.)

advertisement

But in real life, there’s one big difference that makes the whole idea a bit less whimsical: Our goods are not bubbles. Our goods leave behind a much messier residue.

[Hat tip: Triangulation]

About the author

Mark Wilson is a senior writer at Fast Company who has written about design, technology, and culture for almost 15 years. His work has appeared at Gizmodo, Kotaku, PopMech, PopSci, Esquire, American Photo and Lucky Peach

More