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A Boathouse That Proves Good Architecture Is Often Tiny

Architecture Research Office’s super-slick kayak pavilion shows that you can make a grand, award-winning statement with nothing more than corrugated steel and chain-link.

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Architecture Research Office (ARO) has designed a brazenly modern kayak pavilion in Beacon, New York, proving once and for all that boathouses don’t have to resemble something built for the set of Dawson’s Creek.

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The 2,700-square-foot pavilion has a long, flat corrugated steel roof that stretches across steel-and-aluminum-grille racks for storing rental kayaks and canoes. It’s an exquisitely efficient design–it can fit up to 64 boats, a changing room, and a storage area–and it looks pretty slick, to boot. The low-slung profile avoids spoiling views of the Hudson River, and the grille lends the building a transparent quality. From some angles, it seems as though the kayaks are floating in mid-air.

The project also included renovation of a nearby barn and won an AIA New York Chapter Design Award recently. Stay tuned for more awards coverage.

[Images by James Ewing/OTTO]

About the author

Suzanne LaBarre is the editor of Co.Design. Previously, she was the online content director of Popular Science and has written for the New York Times, the New York Observer, Newsday, I.D

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