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A Gorgeous Cabin In The Forest, Made From The Trees It Displaced

Building an eco-friendly home in the middle of a forest sounds like a paradox: Chances are that in the process you’ll have to cut down some trees. The best solution, of course, is to use them as a source of timber. Which is exactly what Paul Morgan Architects did, using a mixture of remnant and newly harvested wood to construct this wondrous cabin in Victoria’s Central Highlands, in Australia.

The 900-square-foot Trunk House was built as a weekend getaway for a married couple with a daughter attending college. “They asked for a small forest cabin in which they could practice choral singing,” according to Paul Morgan. What they got was a round structure with large windows providing views of the lush surroundings and an overhanging roof supported by tree forks made from pieces of wood found on the forest floor joined together with straight columns to form a triangulated truss system. (Internal metal plates provide greater strength.)

The stringybark trees that were removed from the site to make way for the new house were also put to use: A mobile milling machine was brought on-site to turn them into lining boards for the living room.

According to the architects, the result is a riff on “the typology of the small Australian house, conflating it with the precedents of the primitive hut and the tradition of Aboriginal structures.”

[Photos by Peter Bennetts; H/T Inhabitat]

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