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Art Installation Turns Frosty Winterscape Into Candyland

This is a ridiculously simple art installation, but the optical effects are pretty extraordinary.

Art Installation Turns Frosty Winterscape Into Candyland

This is a ridiculously simple art installation, but the optical effects are pretty extraordinary. Japanese artist Toshihiko Shibuya slapped some candy-colored paint on a set of iron disks, then planted them in the snow on variously sized rods, the painted side face down. When the sky clears, the snow in Hokkaido appears so bright and pure, it reflects the disks’ colors promiscuously. From far away, all that pristine white snow looks like somebody spilled a box of giant gumdrops.

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What’s really cool about Snow Pallet 2 is that it changes as winter marches on. Fresh snowfall might sharpen the color of a tall disk and totally bury a short disk. A cloudy day might erase the colors altogether, rendering the entire field an unlovely gray. “It is all dependent on weather but I think that the art in nature should be like this,” Shibuya says. “I try not to control nature but to nestle close to it–to use it cleverly.”

[Images courtesy of Toshihiko Shibuya]

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About the author

Suzanne LaBarre is the editor of Co.Design. Previously, she was the online content director of Popular Science and has written for the New York Times, the New York Observer, Newsday, I.D

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