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Lullaby Crocodile: An Adorable Tribute To The Objects All Around Us

In this music video, a cassette tape snuggles a popsicle, and all of the things around us go to sleep.

I’ve watched No-Domain’s music video for León Family’s Lullaby Crocodile at least five times now. And it only grows more charming each time.

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It’s a manifestation of the ephemeral pocket between the material and the ethereal, the moments before sleep. Cassettes unwind for the night, creating impromptu jam bands that come just short of resembling human figures. 3-D glasses seemingly climb into bunks before snoring in harmony.

Rather than being portrayed through anthropomorphism, like Pixar’s Luxo Jr., these objects become living, breathing beings of another sort. They have no legs or lungs–they have very little that personifies them at all–yet they seem living all the same.

“If you see a cassette from a child’s point of view it has a face, eyes, teeth, and also hair and tongue, but if you see it from an adult´s point of view, it is full of past memories,” writes No-Domain’s Creative Director Joaquín Urbina. “Then, if you open it and break it, you will find a lot of shapes and materials to express art, to draw, to create doodles with tape or a simple movement with breath while whistling. That matched with the idea of the kind of narrative I was looking for.” He calls the video “a dadaism made by kids for adults.”

“I wanted to use them as treasures and trash at [the] same time, like tender wrecks,” Urbina tells us. “All of the objects get lost and broken on screen just like we do in alpha state before falling asleep.” After collecting nostalgic trinkets over the course of a month, the production itself was shot with a Canon 5D Mark II over the course of about a week, as found objects were played with on camera in the hopes of creating “little accidents.” Little accidents, tender wrecks, whatever you want to call the random, loving destruction–it’s a delight.

[Hat tip: Motionographer]

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About the author

Mark Wilson is a senior writer at Fast Company. He started Philanthroper.com, a simple way to give back every day

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