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Simply Cut, Fold, And Wear: Clever Fabric Patterns Yield Hybrid Garments

Simply Cut, Fold, And Wear: Clever Fabric Patterns Yield Hybrid Garments

A few years ago, everyone went gaga when the Japanese retail chain Muji introduced a towel (yes, a towel) that could be snipped along scored perforations and converted into a dish rag. Marly van Lipzig‘s Architecture of Prints is a similar concept: It’s a collection of textiles with pre-set patterns that you cut out yourself. The difference, though, is that instead of producing a boring old dish towel, the fabric yields chic women’s clothes, from sexy kerchief tops to structured babydoll dresses.

The collection features four different textiles, each of which contains sewing patterns for two garments. Van Lipzig, a Dutch designer, created the patterns by manipulating photographs of old industrial construction, such that the “cut-here” lines blend seamlessly with the rest of the print. Then she digitally printed the images on silk and jersey. The fabric is coated to prevent fraying so that you don’t need to finish it with a sewing machine or even a thread and needle. You just select a pattern, cut, fold, then throw it on.

Okay, some of the garments are a bit… outre. A poncho? A dress where your hiney’s exposed? But that’s half the fun. If one pattern’s out of style (or too, erm, immodest for your taste), just snip away at the other one. And hey, anything beats a dish rag.

Architecture of Prints is on view at the graduation show at the Design Academy Eindhoven. Stay tuned on Co.Design for more coverage of the show.

[Top image by Bas van den Boom courtesy of Marly van Lipzig; styling by Lisette van Lipzig; Model: Yvette Serton]

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