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Conceptual Cutlery That Questions Your Food Choices

Forks that don’t stab! Knives that don’t cut! It’s a carnivore’s nightmare.

Conceptual Cutlery That Questions Your Food Choices
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Carnivores, hold onto your drumsticks: Someone clearly dead-set on sucking the joy out of dinnertime has invented cutlery designed explicitly to discourage people from eating meat. That includes several useless, round-tined forks; a knife with an unpolished finish; and a blade which, to judge by the pictures, appears no sharper than a lump of Play-Doh. You’d have better luck hacking into a Porterhouse with a spoon.

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So that settles it, doesn’t it? PETA has won. Pleather and tempeh tacos for everyone.

Well, not exactly. The cutlery, by the young Swiss collective Postfossil, is part of a bigger collection of housewares called “Trattoria Utopia” — on view today at the Milan furniture fair — that’s meant to pose Big Questions about the scarcity of natural resources, right down to meat industry’s sordid imprint on Mother Earth. Postfossil’s stuff is conceived of to provoke, not to wind up on the quotidian shelves of Crate & Barrel.

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Still, it’s worth asking if this brand of design actually has the power to modify behavior — to coax people away from their cheeseburgers and their pork loins and to convince them instead to suck down tofu! Seitan! And a whole bunch of vegetables that’ll give them terrible gas!

The short answer is probably not. And the reason’s simple: No one who eats meat would ever buy cutlery that makes it more difficult for them to consume something they enjoy. The only real market, of course, is art collectors. Who we all know live on a steady diet of gossip, cigarettes, Fiji water, and dividends from the trust fund.

[Images via Postfossil]

About the author

Suzanne LaBarre is the editor of Co.Design. Previously, she was the online content director of Popular Science and has written for the New York Times, the New York Observer, Newsday, I.D

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