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Milan Preview: Kartell’s New Disappearing Furniture

Japanese design master Tokujin Yoshioka will debut ethereal new chairs and tables at Milan next month.

Milan Preview: Kartell’s New Disappearing Furniture
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With the 2011 Milan Furniture Fair just weeks away, our inboxes are filling up with breathless press releases on groundbreaking chairs! Revolutionary couches! Mind-bending dish racks! So far, though, everything’s been pretty… meh.

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One glowing exception: Tokujin Yoshioka‘s new Invisibles Light series for Kartell, which looks like a furniture set sprung from the hands of Houdini.

This isn’t the first time we’ve described Yoshioka’s work that way. Yoshioka, who hails from Japan, is a master of illusion — a genius who can turn ordinary materials from glass to plastic to bird feathers (!) into extraordinary, otherworldly designs.

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Here, he used acrylic to make chairs and tables the objects of a domestic disappearing act. More precisely, he combined the material with ur-minimal forms — note the complete absence of obtuse and acute angles — to create furniture that appears, from certain perspectives, as less of something you’d actually sit in than a 2-D line drawing you’d hang on the wall.

[Images courtesy of Tokujin Yoshioka]

About the author

Suzanne LaBarre is the editor of Co.Design. Previously, she was the online content director of Popular Science and has written for the New York Times, the New York Observer, Newsday, I.D

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