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How a Colorblind Kid Became a Great Graphic Designer [Video]

Yoav Brill creates a wonderful video narrating how he chose such an unlikely path — and which also shows what colorblindness is like.

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Being colorblind is annoying. I know because I am — although my mild red-green colorblindness isn’t as drastic as Yoav Brill’s. He spent his chilldhood being unable to distinguish pink from gray, or even pick out a white flower in a sea of red ones. But that didn’t stop Brill from making an amazing animated film about his experience called Ishihara — named after the instantly recognizable test patterns of colored dots that doctors use to diagnose colorblindness.

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Brill created his imagery using Flash and Adobe After Effects, morphing the troublesome constellations of dots into hearts, eyes, a map of his childhood kibbutz, and even a self-portrait. In an interview with Create Digital Motion, he explains how he deliberately chose a dull color palette for his animations that would replicate the experience of his condition for normal viewers.

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Watch the film and you’ll get a heartfelt glimpse into what it’s like growing up just a little…off. But with “Ishihara” already winning international film festival awards, Brill’s minor handicap clearly isn’t holding him back in his chosen career. As he says in the interview: “My color blindness was not a big problem… After a while you remember the CMYK numbers!”

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About the author

John Pavlus is a writer and filmmaker focusing on science, tech, and design topics. His writing has appeared in Wired, New York, Scientific American, Technology Review, BBC Future, and other outlets

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