advertisement
advertisement

Sign of the Times: Pot Sold in Eco-Friendly Packaging

A Santa Rosa dispensary offers weed in compostable baggies — a sign of the evolving marketing of weed.

Pot is going green(er).

advertisement
advertisement

OrganiCann, a monster dispensary in Santa Rosa, California has developed compostable packaging designed to make your morning bong rip medical cannabis that much more guilt-free. Most weed comes in eco-unfriendly plastic baggies. As Packaging of the World reports, OrganiCann’s various strains of Purple Rain and White Widow and Mr. Nice are now available in a film made of sustainably produced wood that biodegrades in a home or commercial composter. The film’s then printed using water-based inks and says stuff like “natural medicine” and has a Red Cross logo, but in green. Get it? Get it?

Obviously this is a marketing ploy, a moderately clever effort to tap into the counterculture’s twin love of maryjane and Mother Earth. But the fact that a major dispensary in Santa Rosa — the Holy Land for California’s stoners second only to midnight showings of The Big Lebowski — even bothers with a marketing ploy in the first place is proof of a new economic reality. (To be fair, weed has always been marketed to some extent, but it used to be limited to your dealer promising either a body high or a mind high.)

Consider SPARC, a haute-design dispensary in San Francisco, which we reported on a couple months ago calling it “the Apple store of marijuana shops.” Selling products on sustainability and design: Sound familiar? These are the same tactics that companies like Target dispatch to flog task lights and wicker furniture. Pot might not be entirely legal — yet — but its purveyors have already adopted the promotional formulas of a corporation trading on Wall Street. As dispensaries transform into full-blown, tax-paying, law-abiding businesses, we can expect to see more of this.

[Top image courtesy of OrganiCann; bottom image via Packaging of the World]

advertisement
advertisement

About the author

Suzanne LaBarre is the editor of Co.Design. Previously, she was the online content director of Popular Science and has written for the New York Times, the New York Observer, Newsday, I.D

More