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High-Design Hannukah: The $1,000 Richard Meier Menorah

Hanukkah is still several weeks away, but we can’t resist showing you this gem of a menorah, by the inimitable Richard Meier.

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Meier, for those of you who don’t own a T-square, is the architect who made a career out of turning boring old white boxes into works of art. He designed the Museum of Television & Radio in Beverly Hills and the stunning Getty Center in L.A. When you ask freakishly rich people what kind of house they either want or own, they invariably reply: “a Richard Meier.”

[A sketch by Meier]

Lucky for us, then, that Meier has turned his hand to the humble menorah. Designed for New York’s Jewish Museum, it’s a reproduction of the architect’s “Meier Lamp,” commissioned by the Israel Museum in 1985. “Each candleholder is an abstracted representation of an architectural style from significant moments of persecution in the history of Jews,? Meier explains in a press release.

So it’s got everything from an obelisk (on the left), symbolizing the Jews’s expulsion from Egypt, to a watchtower (on the right), representing the concentration camps of Nazi Germany.

“These are not intended as literal representations of specific events,” Meier goes on, ?but rather as reminders of the common past and struggles that Jewish people have suffered and their resilience and strength that is so wonderfully captured by the Hanukkah story.”

The menorahs are available as a limited edition for $1,000 a pop. So they aren’t cheap. But think of it this way: It’s like getting eight Richard Meiers in one. Buy it here.

[Images courtesy of “>Richard Meier & Partners]

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