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Sculptural Apartment Is an Exhibitionist’s Dream Home

The “Narrow House” brings candy-colored theatrics to a sleepy street in Belgium.

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Attention Belgian drama-queens: Brussels-based architect Bassam el-Okeily has got the pied-à-terre for you! Why settle for snoozy aluminum siding when you can have a front facade that looks like a mini-Cirque du Soleil?

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El-Okeily’s “Narrow House”, created in collaboration with Karla Menten, boasts a two-storey, glass encased atrium-as-lightshow — including two asymmetrical balconies, from which you can say hi to your neighbors strike theatrical poses while bathing in an ephemeral glow.

Complements the surrounding property nicely, doesn’t it? (And actually, you can’t buy it; an artist couple already lives there.)

Kidding aside, the architects have done an amazing job with an unforgiving, narrow space. The white-on-white look makes every interior feel larger, and from this view of the back yard, you’d never guess the lot is just 5.3 meters wide:

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Inside, asymmetrical cutaways bring tons of natural light inside the upper-level studio space and main living area.

Granted, it might be annoying to live across the street from this ostentatious piece of architectural performance art, but that’s just because you’re jealous. I’m sure the folks who live there throw great barbecues.

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About the author

John Pavlus is a writer and filmmaker focusing on science, tech, and design topics. His writing has appeared in Wired, New York, Scientific American, Technology Review, BBC Future, and other outlets

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