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Humorless Apple Censors Goofy iPhone App With Half-Naked Dudes

They would be totally naked except, ya’ know, Steve Jobs is a prude.

Francis Lam, of db-db-db, might be the goofiest designer making apps for the iPhone. For a long time, he has thought that there are too many naked chicks in the digital world. The designer’s solution: up the quotient of nekkid mens. Enter the Nudemen–sorry, Numen Camera.

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Numen turns everything you capture on your iPhone into a bunch of half-naked dudes. Steve Jobs being Steve Jobs, the men required a sort of virtual fig leaf. Click the app, and a clutch of guys in hot-pink skivvies pops up in the center — your pic button. Snap a photo, and the image instantly converts to an even bigger clutch of guys in hot-pink skivvies. Think of it as the Playgirl (RIP) of iPhone apps. That, or the Continental Baths.

[Before]

[After]

Note the many skin colors. It’s like “We Are The World,” only racier and without Kenny Rogers.

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Numen Camera is db-db-db’s latest foray into naked-man art. Past projects include nudemessenger.com, a website for sending flash e-cards of naked dudes (Flash! Get it?); Nudemen Clock, which is exactly what it sounds like; and Nudemen Garden, a video in which naked men congregate around people’s real-time movements then tumble into a big gay garden. Tag line: “When nudemen come, the flowers blossom out.”

Then db-db-db started making iPhone apps, and suddenly, the Nudemen became not-so-Nudemen (hence the pink undies and the new name). Guess we shouldn’t be surprised that Apple’s no-nips policy extends to male nether regions, even if it is a 2-D cartoon that looks like a eunuch. But it kinda defeats the whole purpose, right? That something that’s obviously meant as a joke is treated as youth-corrupting smut proves, yet again, that Apple has its head in the wrong place.

[Via CreativeApplications.net]

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About the author

Suzanne LaBarre is the editor of Co.Design. Previously, she was the online content director of Popular Science and has written for the New York Times, the New York Observer, Newsday, I.D

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