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Fast Company’s Gulf Oil Spill Scorecard

Members of the National Ocean Industries Association (NOIA), a domestic offshore energy industry group, want to help out with the Gulf oil spill for obvious reasons–it makes them look good and it helps ensure industry survival. But some members are doing more to help than others. Below, we take a look at who’s doing what in the scramble to clean up the Gulf. ExxonMobil

Fast Company’s Gulf Oil Spill Scorecard
Gulf oil spill fire

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Members of the National Ocean Industries Association (NOIA), a domestic offshore energy industry group, want to help out with the Gulf oil spill for obvious reasons–it makes them look good and it helps ensure industry survival. But some members are doing more to help than others. Below, we take a look at who’s doing what in the scramble to clean up the Gulf.

ExxonMobil

Overview: $19 billion in profits last year, largest publicly traded integrated petroleum and natural gas company

Oil Spill Response: Exxon has offered up a drilling rig as a staging base along with two supply
vessels, an underwater vehicle and support vessel, and technical advice on blowout
preventers, dispersant injection, well construction and containment
options. The company is also working on response and cleanup by providing radios, fire boom, and the continued production of chemical dispersants.

Score: 8/10. Exxon is doing its part, but we wish that it would admit that Corexit, the company’s chemical dispersant of choice, may not be the best product for the job.

Shell Oil

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Overview: $12.5 billion in profits last year (for Royal Dutch Shell)

Oil Spill Response: Shell is providing six oil spill response vessels for firefighting and search and rescue, one vessel with a remotely operated underwater vehicle, an ROV hot stab panel, a helicopter, chemical dispersants, a containment dome, technical experts, and a conference center in Louisiana.

Score: 8/10. Unlike Exxon, Shell is failing to provide any sort of emergency response and cleanup materials besides its OSRVs. Kudos on attempting to provide a real solution to the spill with the containment dome, though.

ConocoPhilips

Overview: $4.8 billion in profits last year

Oil Spill Response: ConocoPhilips is allowing BP to access an adjacent ConocoPhillips’ lease for a relief well. The company also is offering technical advice, chartered helicopters, marine vessels, a pair of shore bases in Louisiana, funding for dispersants and cleanup equipment, and a system for employees to make charitable contributions to nonprofits involved in the cleanup.

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Score: 7/10. ConocoPhilips seems to be making a worthwhile effort. We especially like the company’s charitable contribution system.

Anadarko

Overview: $3.3 billion in profit in 2008, owns 25% stake in ruptured Gulf oil well

Oil Spill Response: The company has four employees inside BP assisting their technical teams.

Score: 1/10. Seriously? Anadarko may be smaller than Exxon, Shell, and ConocoPhilips, but the company owns part of the obliterated well. Can’t it provide a little more than technical assistance?

StatOil

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Overview: $2.9 billion in profits last year, biggest offshore oil and gas company in the world

Oil Spill Response: StatOil says that it has “offered both spill assistance and drilling and well competence.”

Score: 1/10. The world’s biggest offshore oil and gas company might get some good karma if it provided some actual supplies.

Marine Spill Response Corporation (MSRC)

Overview: Nonprofit national spill response company

Oil Spill Response: MSRC is providing a laundry list of equipment, including eight Oil Spill Response Vessels, three ocean-barges on site to capture and store oil, a number of shallow water barges, six Fast Response Vehicles, and several fire boom systems. The organization also is coordinating four C-130 dispersant-spraying aircraft, six smaller planes that act as
spotters, and the deployment of over 700,000 feet of boom.

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Score: 9/10. If a nonprofit can do this much, certainly multi-billion dollar oil companies can provide more equipment–even if this is MSRC’s main gig.

[NOIA]

Read more about the Gulf Oil Spill

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About the author

Ariel Schwartz is a Senior Editor at Co.Exist. She has contributed to SF Weekly, Popular Science, Inhabitat, Greenbiz, NBC Bay Area, GOOD Magazine and more

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