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Why Stop at “Happy Camper” When You Can Create “Raving Fan”?

Yes, here is another example of superior customer service that turned me from “disgruntled customer” into a “happy camper” – but not into a “raving fan”!

Yes, here is another example of superior customer service that turned me from “disgruntled customer” into a “happy camper” – but not into a “raving fan”!

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A window cleaning company employee broke a handle off one of our windows (no, I won’t get on a ladder to clean the third story windows!).  The window cleaning company told me they would pay for the replacement handle – but, seriously, they broke it so they should pay for it right?  However, I had to order the handle, replace it and then send them the receipt to get reimbursed.  This is not the example of superior customer service!   Why should I be hassled to correct their mistake? To make me a “raving fan,” – which should always be the objective when correcting a mistakethe window cleaning company should have ordered the handle and then stopped by and put it on the window at no charge to me.  That would have made me want to continue to do business with them.  Merely doing what they were obligated to do – pay for the replacement part – has cost them a customer and referrals – Whenever I receive superior customer service I recommend the company to the other 24 residents of our home owners association. They will not be getting a recommendation. 

The example of superior customer occurred when I ordered the replacement handle from Pella Windows. Rather than go to the Pella warehouse, I asked that the replacement handle be mailed to me.  When it arrived it was the wrong handle.  I would now have to travel to the Pella Warehouse (a 60 minute round trip) with the broken handle to get the right replacement part.  I was not a happy camper!  A day later, I got a call from a Pella Service Representative who asked if I had received the part and was satisfied with it.  When I told her I was definitely not satisfied, she immediately got the information about the broken handle and said it would be delivered to me the next day by Fed Ex at no charge. 

This made me a happy camper and changed me from “irritated customer” to “happy camper”.  What would it take to make me a “raving fan”?  Perhaps a reimbursement of the cost of the handle to show they were sorry about the original mistake and the hassle (minimal I agree) it caused me. 

Or am I just too hard to please? 

Maybe like some of your best customers?

The Bottom Line:  When you have a chance to transform a “disgruntled customer” into a “raving fan” don’t stop half way at the “happy camper” stage! You may never have another opportunity to impress this customer with how much you value their business.

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And you never know who has the ability to increase your business through referrals – so give every customer superior customer service (even though you may not give them the big customer discount).  

 

The Question:  How far will you go to rectify a mistake and create a “raving fan”?