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Toxie Awards Go To BPA, Lead, Pthalates and More

Just in time for the Oscars, Californians for a Healthy and Green Economy have announced the winners of the Toxies, an actual red carpet event that honored so-called “Bad Actor Chemicals” or toxic compounds found in many everyday products.

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Just in time for the Oscars, Californians for a Healthy and Green Economy have announced the winners of the Toxies, an actual red carpet event that honored so-called “Bad Actor Chemicals” or toxic compounds found in many everyday products.

Some of the winners:

Worst Breakthrough Performance and Viewer’s Choice Award for Worst Chemical of 2009: Bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogen impersonator found in polycarbonate plastics used in baby bottles, reusable food and water containers and canned food liners. Linked to breast cancer, prostate cancer and infertility.

Lifetime Achievement in Harm: Lead, used in everything from paint and lunchboxes to candy and children’s toys, can interfere with children’s intellectual and behavioral development.

Worst Viral Media Performance: Triclosan, a pesticide used in hand sanitizer, antiperspirants, household cleaners, and toothpaste that can produce other toxic compounds.

Worst Costume: Perchlorethylene, commonly used in dry cleaning but can cause dizziness, nausea and organ damage.

Worst Stripper Performance: N-methyl pyrrolidone (NMP), an industrial solvent used in chemical processing, paint stripper and graffiti remover.

Worst Special Effects: Perchlorate, an oxidizer used in fireworks, airbags, explosives and rocket fuel that can contaminate drinking water.

The Toxies even rounded up actors to play each chemical.

Sadly, the Toxie event for this year is over–it was held on March 3 at the Egyptian Theater in Hollywood. But the organizers plan to make it an annual event, and there’s still more toxic chemical goodness to come next week when the California’s Department of Toxic Substances unveils its Green Chemistry Initiative.

[Via Greenbiz]

About the author

Ariel Schwartz is a Senior Editor at Co.Exist. She has contributed to SF Weekly, Popular Science, Inhabitat, Greenbiz, NBC Bay Area, GOOD Magazine and more

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