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SuperSkin Helmet Grotesquely, but Safely, Imitates “Skin Stretched Over a Skull”

Something about the phrase “skin stretched over a skull” gives me the willies, but to IDC, makers of the SuperSkin helmet, it just means good safety.

SuperSkin helmet

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Something about the phrase “skin stretched over a skull” gives me the willies, but to IDC, makers of the SuperSkin helmet, it just means good safety.

The SuperSkin helmet, to be made by Lazer Helmets, imitates the natural flexibility of our own anatomy, a lot like BMW’s shape-shifting GINA car. This helmet allows a thin outer layer to move somewhat freely over a harder inner layer, thanks to some lubrication between the layers. The idea is that while typical helmets protect only against one type of straightforward impact, they ignore rotational impact, which can twist the neck and cause just as much injury. Instead, the SuperSkin helmet provides a little give, protecting the head while allowing for a more natural response to blunt head trauma.

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On the materials:

The revolutionary product design required careful selection of materials. A strong synthetic sits on top of the gel-like lubricant to
form a protective layer across the surface of the helmet. State-of-the-art vacuum casting was used to create prototypes and the materials tested for resistance and strength. The chosen synthetic stretched up to eight times its original length.

SuperSkin will hit the market this summer under the Lazer Helmets brand, in either the full-face Solano (about $315) or the open-face Rider (about $235).

[Via Core77]

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About the author

Dan Nosowitz is a freelance writer and editor who has written for Popular Science, The Awl, Gizmodo, Fast Company, BuzzFeed, and elsewhere. He holds an undergraduate degree from McGill University and currently lives in Brooklyn, because he has a beard and glasses and that's the law

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