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Will TwitVid’s Real Time Search Inject Life Into Twitter Video?

TwitVid.com is trying a new tack to make its Twitter-friendly video-upload service enticing for users: It’s launching a real-time search function. As well as jumping on the real-time bandwagon, it’s an attempt to get more people video-Tweeting.

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TwitVid.com is trying a new tack to make its Twitter-friendly video-upload service enticing for users: It’s launching a real-time search function. As well as jumping on the real-time bandwagon, it’s an attempt to get more people video-Tweeting.

TwitVid’s new system is quite nifty, actually–before you were pretty limited about what videos you could find when you visited the site, but now you can search for relevant videos both on TwitVid.com and YouTube. It’s not a straightforward keyword search, since the algorithm seems to look at how new the video is, and how heavily discussed the content has been on social sites–like Twitter of course.

Simultaneously, TwitVid is launching a new analytics service that reveals when people were viewing video content, where these visitors are coming from, and which other sites are your top-referrers: Vital stuff for professional video-makers.

TwitVid

But who are these video-Tweeters, professional or not? Is TwitVid’s effort going to make a big splash or not? That’s a difficult question, and it’s borne out by experience: Assuming you’re a Twitterer, how many Tweets you receive include links to home-spun video or re-blogged video content on services like TwitVid or Posterous? Not much, I bet–most people’s Tweets include links to other Web pages or the occasional uploaded picture, using a service like TwitPic. TwitVid has had some very positive press, and the new analytics will certainly help with that, as will the real-time search powers. That’s something that everyone, Google included, is very excited about at the moment, and TwitVid’s timing couldn’t be more ideal. That’s because Google’s now linking to Tweets in real time, and if an individual Tweet contains a link to a TwitVid, it could certainly drive up traffic to the site. Particularly if a Twitterer is the source of some breaking news.

And, you never know, it could inject some excitement and life into Twitter video Tweets–Veeps? Videets? They could become a significant part of how Twitter works, acting as a sort of micro-video-podcast perhaps. That’s guesswork, of course, but Twitter’s such a dynamic entity with new uses and exploitations surfacing all the time (and being taken on-board by Twitter’s developers themselves) that anything’s possible. Which is obviously what TwitVid’s hoping.

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[Via CNET] Follow me on Twitter for more discussion: Kit Eaton.

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