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Stuart Haygarth Turns Our Disposable Lifestyles Into Art

The eco-artist turns the things we throw away into stunning decorative objects–from chandeliers made of washed up trash, to coffee tables made of broken rear-view mirrors.

Stuart Haygarth

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Stuart Haygarth is usually dubbed an eco-artist. But most eco-artists tend to be less interested in creating beauty and more into political statements. Haygarth, instead, is a crowd-pleaser. By assembling discarded bits of everyday life into massive chandeliers and furniture, he literally turns trash into treasure.

Today, the venerable Haunch of Venison gallery in London is opening a survey of Haygarth’s work, and Wallpaper* has a charming slideshow of the pieces on display.

Here’s a few of them. Above: “Millennium,” a chandelier made of hundreds of discarded party poppers.

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Disposable, which is made of over 400 disposable champagne flutes:

Stuart Haygarth

One of Haygarth’s most famous pieces, Tides, which was made of hundreds of pieces of plastic junk which washed ashore near his home in England:

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Stuart Haygarth

A detail:

Stuart Haygarth

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Via Wallpaper*, a table constructed from the remains of hundreds of crushed rear-view car mirrors:

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For more, make sure to check out Wallpaper*.

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About the author

Cliff was director of product innovation at Fast Company, founding editor of Co.Design, and former design editor at both Fast Company and Wired.

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