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HOMErgents Bring Refugee Shelters Back to Basics

homergent

As the number of climate-related natural disasters increases, so does the need for quality, affordable shelters. Some of the more creative designs include the Cork Block Shelter and the Seashelter (both winners of the Design It:Shelter competition), but HOMErgent takes shelter design back to basics with a hexagonal pop-up, hardwalled shelter that efficiently harvests waste and energy resources. And unlike other shelters, the HOMErgent shelter is made to feel like a real home.

The shelter, designed as a “hexayurt” uses solar and wind power, LED lighting, and ultra-insulated walls to stay completely off-grid while offering water purification, cooking options, and temperature control. It’s portable, too–a single 4×8 pallet can hold 4-6 flat-packed homes, and two people can lift a complete home. HOMErgent’s shelter also lasts anywhere between 5 and 20 years, can withstand winds up to 70 mph, and has optional platforms for mud and flooding.

HOMErgent doesn’t say how much the shelter costs, but we can only assume it’s cheap enough for the target market (governments and NGO’s) to afford for mass deployment. Even if it is slightly more expensive than standard models, the well-equipped shelter could save cash on disease prevention in squalid refugee camps.

[Via DVICE]

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