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Intel’s Pricy e-Reader Packs Added Accessibility for Millions of New Users

Deep in the technology bunker of Fast Company we like us some e-readers–although some of us are just as partial to scuffed-up paperback books as well. Intel Corporation has just debuted their version, the Intel Reader.

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Intel Reader

Deep in the technology bunker of Fast Company we like us some e-readers–although some of us are just as partial to scuffed-up paperback books as well. Intel Corporation has just debuted their version, the Intel Reader.

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Unlike most e-books, which, a couple of years on from their inception, are beginning to get a bit samey, the Intel Reader really has a unique selling point: it can be used as a reading aid for dyslexics, people with learning disabilities, and the partially sighted and visibly challenged; that’s a market of around 55 million people.

The size of a paperback, the Intel Reader converts printed text to digital, before reading it aloud to the user, thanks to its high-res camera, which allows users to snap away at pages or documents in order to listen to the printed word.

Intel Reader

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All this goodness comes at a price: The Reader costs $1,500. There’s also a Portable Capture Station, which allows you to capture large amounts of text quickly–such as a chapter or even an entire book–which will set you back an extra $400.

[Via Intel]

About the author

My writing career has taken me all round the houses over the past decade and a half--from grumpy teens and hungover rock bands in the U.K., where I was born, via celebrity interviews, health, tech and fashion in Madrid and Paris, before returning to London, where I now live. For the past five years I've been writing about technology and innovation for U.S

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