advertisement
advertisement

Fresh Faces, Fresh Ideas: The Eye-Catching Work of Three Design Students

Ideas ranging from novice-friendly power tools to lamps with shades made of your scrap paper.

It doesn’t happen all the time, but on occasion, you see student design work that doesn’t look student-y at all–young and cool of course, but also strikingly polished. And that’s exactly what struck us in work from three designers, all of them either just out of school or still studying: Bethan Laura Wood, Gaby Crohn, and Daniel Rawlings. Here’s a selection of their work:

advertisement
advertisement

Via Designboom comes this lamp by Gaby Crohn. Ordinarily, it looks like a handsome desk lamp with a bare light bulb. But that ring around the top is actually a clip for holding all those scraps of paper that clutter your desk; when in use, it functions like a lamp shade. Thus, you get a bit of added function and organization from pieces of paper that aren’t quite useful, but which you can’t throw out just yet:

Gaby Crohn

Gaby Crohn

Pokono alerted us to the work of Bethan Laura Wood. Her “Stain” series of teacups made a virtue of the patina that gradually builds on an object over time. The inside of each cup arrives spotless and white, but the inside has been treated so everyday use eventually reveals a predetermined pattern:

Bethan Laura Wood

For her “Umbrella” table, Wood was inspired by the workings of its namesake, which she recreated using laser cut wood. When not in use, the tables support structure folds away:

advertisement
Bethan Laura Wood

Bethan Laura Wood

Daniel Rawlings has an eye for super-simple interventions. Via Dezeen comes this series of vases, which begin as broken pieces of crockery. Rawlings revives them by using “heat-shrink” plastics, which mold to a surface when heated, thus creating an entirely new vase:

Daniel Rawlings

Daniel Rawlings

Rawlings uses the same technique to create this trestle table–but the joint formed by the plastic means that the trestles can be folded up after use:

advertisement
Daniel Rawlings

Daniel Rawlings

On a different tack, Rawlings designed this drill and sander, with the aim of getting away from the intimidating, ultra-butch look of most power tools. The idea is to make DIY projects more appealing to a wider audience:

Daniel Rawlings

[Check out Designboom, Ponoko and Dezeen for more pictures and info about the projects above]

advertisement
advertisement

About the author

Cliff was director of product innovation at Fast Company, founding editor of Co.Design, and former design editor at both Fast Company and Wired.

More