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  • 07.21.09

Our Brains Versus Fast Food? No Contest

Do we crave flavor, or just calories? A new study reveals that our brain chemistry may be to blame for our love affair with food.

junk food

Is giving up just bad diet discipline? It may be the way our brains are wired, say researchers at Duke University who discovered that the brain craves calories–even in the absence of taste.

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Using
two groups of mice, one of which lacked the ability to detect sweetness, researchers
conditioned the animals to a bottle of water and a bottle of sucrose solution.
Afterward, preference tests were conducted, which showed that both the normal
mice and the taste-impaired mice preferred the sucrose solution to water.

The experiment was then repeated, only this time, the artificial sweetener sucralose replaced the sucrose solution.
When preference tests were conducted, the normal mice favored the sucralose
solution, but the taste-less mice showed no preference.

The conclusion? The
mice were responding to the caloric content, explaining their
attraction to the sucrose solution. Researchers also found that neurons in the
brain had higher responses when mice were consuming sucrose as compared to
sucralose.

Former FDA Commissioner David Kessler has a best-selling book called The End of Overeating, charging that food companies have conditioned our brains to crave fat, sugar, and salt, and this research would appear to confirm his findings. America is already in the midst of an obesity epidemic (the
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that more than 30% of U.S. adults
are obese), and the idea that our brains actually crave calories is less than
encouraging. Worse, as consumers’ purse strings continue to tighten,
the pull of something off of McDonald’s value menu becomes doubly strong: The price tag and the 440 calories are sucking
you in. No wonder McD’s continues to succeed.

Next time you succumb to that pint, blame science. At least your lack of willpower and discipline are losing to forces larger than you.

[Via: ScienceBlogs]

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