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Weathirization Barnraisings? Why Not?

Want to make a REAL impact on carbon footprint, as well as put money back in the pockets of those suffering in this troubled economy (or perhaps those who never participated in the economic boom in the first place)?

I got an e-mail describing a wonderful sustainability project in Cambridge, MA–one that would be easy to replicate anywhere: Weatherization Barnraisings.

Steve Morr-Wineman, one of the initiators, wrote that a group of people organized…

<blockquote>a local energy co-op called the Home Energy Efficiency Team (HEET).  In August we organized our first event – a weatherization barnraising.  It was a simple idea: bring people together to weatherize a house by doing things like insulating doors, windows, and pipes, and installing programmable thermostats and compact fluorescent lightbulbs.  We publicized the event with a simple flyer, got on some listserves, and then it just took off through word of mouth – and 40 people showed up.
 
Since then we’ve been doing one weatherization barnraising a month, and people just keep turning out; 30-40 every time.  We’ve assembled a pool of skilled team leaders, gotten contractors to come for free to some of the events, and have expanded the range of weatherizing we can do.  The multiplier effects are huge, because people are learning skills they can use to weatherize their own homes. </blockquote>

<a href=”http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2008/11/30/turning_up_heet/”>The Boston Globe even ran a story on the community weatherization project</a>, noting that the group is looking at doing public buildings as well, including a school.

If you’d like to start your own weatherization group, <a href=”http://www.audreyschulman.com/HEET/manual3.htm”>Morr-Wneman and his friends have posted a free how-to manual at http://www.audreyschulman.com/HEET/manual3.htm</a>

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