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Living for Social Networks, Literally

More and more elderly people are joining social networks, according to The New York Times, and it may be saving them from death by boredom. Among senior citizens who ventured online in 2008, the number that visited social networks like Eons, a social network aimed at aging boomers; Facebook, and MySpace grew at twice the rate of overall elderly Internet use, according to comScore.

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More
and more elderly people
are joining social networks, according to The New
York Times
, and it may be saving
them from death by boredom.

advertisement

Among senior citizens who ventured online in 2008, the number that
visited social networks like Eons, a
social network aimed at aging boomers; Facebook, and MySpace grew at twice the rate of overall elderly Internet use, according to comScore.

At least one third of older people live alone, according to AARP, and isolation has prompted
them to explore social networks where they can make and maintain
friendships. According to the BBC, research
has shown that high levels of socialization help people live longer.
Below, Eons markets itself as a way to “build your brain” by entering
into discussion groups and playing games.

Eons

[Via New
York Times
]

About the author

I've written about innovation, design, and technology for Fast Company since 2007. I was the co-founding editor of FastCoLabs

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