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Dutch Design Arrives in New York

This Satuday, the Cite gallery will open up 400 Years Later: Cite Goes Dutch, a month-long design exhibition. Curated by Alissia Melka-Teichroew and Jan Habraken–both young Dutch designers living in New York–the exhibition focuses on a younger generation.

This Satuday, the Cite gallery will open up 400 Years Later: Cite Goes Dutch, a month-long design exhibition. Curated by Alissia Melka-Teichroew and Jan Habraken–both young Dutch designers living in New York–the exhibition focuses on a younger generation. There’s a signature Dutch-ness to the work: Functionality that’s so extreme that it’s campy; a chumminess that springs from design that doesn’t take itself too seriously; and, above all, excellent craft. In all, 23 designers and 1 photographer will show their work. Here’s a sneak peek of some of the best work (scroll down for information about the show):

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Jorre van Ast’s Clamp-A-Leg table is disarmingly simple. Hooks screw on to the tops of the legs; these slide over the edge of the table top:

Clamp a Leg

Clamp a Leg4

Another clever, simple approach to function by Jorre van Ast: Tops that screw onto jars, making them into a range of useful table ware items and storage pieces:

jar-tops_group-lowressq

Susan Verheijen’s Form-Matic series of tools looks like a single piece being shrunk down, like a series of Russian nesting dolls. But each piece has a slightly different function. The third smallest is a nutcracker; the second smallest is a bottle opener, and the ring at the far left is a measuring tool–slide it over some spaghetti, and it tells exactly how much is in a single serving:

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Formatic2

Formatic1

Jan Habraken’s Mirror Mirror provides a detachable hand-held mirror, for looking at yourself up close and checking out your backside:

Mirror_Mirror

Habraken’s Shovel Birdhouse gives birds a place to rest that also happens to be exactly where they’ll have the easiest time rooting out fresh worms: Ground that’s freshly shoveled.

Shovel_BirdHouse_1

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Another clever birdhouse, by Studio OOOMS. Solar panels on the roof charge the light out front; it can serve as a night light in the garden, but also as a snack bar for the birds, since the light attracts bugs:

solarbirdhouse01

Lotte van Laatum’s Tree Cabinet was made from wood felled by a epidemic of elm disease in 1999. Almost ten years later, she memorialized the tree by leaving it’s natural shape in the drawer:

Treecabinet 1

Laurens van Wieringen’s Softy lamp looks like cast steel, but it’s actually covered textured rubber, and it bends to your whim:

Soft_Lamps

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Alissia Melka-Teichroew’s surprisingly elegant jointed jewelry:

Jointed Jewellery_Necklace_variabal_white_overview

Anthony Duffeleer’s giant-sized O Clock has a light touch for such a large piece. It can be rolled to change its orientation in a room:

O'Clock

Frederik Roijé’s beautifully minimal candle chandelier:

riseofflame_2XL

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Lucas Maassen’s Yoga Chairs are aptly named. Each piece is both anthropomorphic and abstract, recalling a famous yoga position:

YogaChairs

Sander Mulder’s About Time clock tells the time by rolling around as the hours pass; in between, it’s a bit more vague on the exact minutes, which is meant to encourage a more relaxed pace of life:

about_time_2

Check out the show, running from Saturday, May 16 through June 14:

CITE Showroom
131 Greene Street (between Prince and W Houston St.)
New York, NY 10012, USA

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OPENING HOURS
11:00 am – 7:00 pm Monday through Saturday
12:00 pm – 6:00 pm Sunday

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About the author

Cliff is director of product innovation at Fast Company, founding editor of Co.Design, and former design editor at both Fast Company and Wired.

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