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Can the iHouse SmartFaucet–and its Facial Recognition Technology–Save Water?

iHouse, a Brazilian company that makes products like fingerprint activated doors and cell phone-controlled window blinds, is working on a faucet with facial recognition that turns water on to temperature and flow preferences. The tap saves preferences for multiple users, so every member of a household can have settings adjusted instantly. The device’s LED display changes from blue (cold) to red (hot) when the temperature changes.

ihouse-smart-faucet

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iHouse, a Brazilian company that makes products like fingerprint activated doors and cell phone-controlled window blinds, is working on a faucet with facial recognition that turns water on to temperature and flow preferences. The tap saves preferences for multiple users, so every member of a household can have settings adjusted instantly. The device’s LED display changes from blue (cold) to red (hot) when the temperature changes.

That’s not all–the SmartFaucet also has a touchscreen that can be used to check your calendar, check the outside temperature, and even access email. The touchscreen seems a little superfluous–isn’t the SmartFaucet supposed to conserve energy?–but the faucet itself could save a significant amount of water for households with lots of people coming and going. I do wonder, though, if the SmartFaucet could be simplified with temperature/flow presets in the place of facial recognition software.

No word yet from iHouse on pricing for the SmartFaucet. The device probably won’t be cheap, but denizens of drought-stricken areas could use the help.

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About the author

Ariel Schwartz is a Senior Editor at Co.Exist. She has contributed to SF Weekly, Popular Science, Inhabitat, Greenbiz, NBC Bay Area, GOOD Magazine and more

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