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  • 04.20.09

Viva Le Louvre! At 20, I.M. Pei’s Controversial Pyramid Defies Critics

From the moment I.M. Pei’s design for the pyramidal addition to the Musee du Louvre was introduced in 1985, it was the subject of controversy and international attention. Critics derided it as a violation of the museum’s classical integrity. But two decades later, it is one of the top tourist attractions in Paris.

Viva Le Louvre! At 20, I.M. Pei’s Controversial Pyramid Defies Critics
Louvre

From the moment I.M. Pei’s design for the pyramidal addition to the Musee du Louvre was introduced in 1985, it was the subject of controversy and international attention, derided as a violation of the museum’s classical integrity. But two decades later, it is one of the top tourist attractions in Paris, attracting some 8.5 million annual visitors.

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Two weeks ago I traveled to Paris for the 20th Anniversary celebration of the project. It was also a reunion of the original team that worked on this historic project, including our firm, which worked closely with the architects on developing the original wayfinding and signage.

The week of festivities included a light installation by Jenny Holzer, lectures and films. But the highlight was a daylong seminar about Pei’s architectural plan, its impact on the Louvre and on the city of Paris. Architects and curators dramatically recounted the massively complex process, from design conception through final construction, in a series of presentations. The key point reinforced throughout the day was that Pei’s design was more about urbanism than architecture. It responded to the desperate need to integrate the museum into the fabric of the city and transform the Louvre’s main courtyard from a dismal parking lot to a grand public gathering place.

I. M. Pei

Recent studies show that the Louvre now draws nearly twice the number of visitors than it did before the Pyramid’s installation. Due to continuing crowd control challenges, it is somewhat a victim of its own success. However, with its elegant structural web of supports and cables, the Pyramid remains an architectural and engineering marvel.

During the conference, Pei was asked to say a few words and at 92 he has lost none of his charm. In a simple statement he thanked the Louvre for “allowing him to discover so much about France” and said that the experience “gave more to him than he gave to the museum.”

Certainly an architectural project that costs a zillion dollars rarely results in a small gesture. However, it’s clear from a perspective of 20 years, that at the Louvre, Pei achieved a kind of architectural sleight-of-hand with so much more there than meets the eye.

The “Yes to Less” rating is based on three criteria: beauty, ingenuity, and functionality. Designs can earn as many as five stars (“Flawless”), or as few as one (“Clueless.”)

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Readers are invited to nominate design examples–from the brilliant to the egregious–for Carbone’s consideration.

About the author

Ken Carbone is a designer, artist, musician, author and teacher. He is the Co-Founder and Chief Creative Director of the Carbone Smolan Agency, a design and branding company in New York City.

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