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Sony Vaio P Now Official: a Lifestyle PC, Not a Netbook

After all that teasing, Sony’s finally unwrapped the small and slim Vaio P. And as Sony’s spin has it, it’s not so much a netbook as a Windows Vista-running, super-widescreen “Lifestyle PC,” so very sleekly designed it almost redefines the netbook class.

After all that teasing, Sony’s finally unwrapped the small and slim Vaio P. And as Sony’s spin has it, it’s not so much a netbook as a Windows Vista-running, super-widescreen “Lifestyle PC,” so very sleekly designed it almost redefines the netbook class.

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And, to be honest, I won’t argue with that statement since netbooks are touted as super-portable, low-powered cheap devices, and the Vaio P only meets the portable part of that. Think “miniature notebook” says Sony.

The screen is an 8-inch 1600 x 768 pixel which blows standard 16:9 widescreen out of the water, and is LED-backlit. Meanwhile it runs an “Intel 1.33GHz processor” which sounds like an Atom Z520, and it packs in a hefty 2GB of DDR2 SDRAM with a 60GB hard drive and options of up to 128GB SSD. There’s also 802.11 b, g and n wireless aboard, alongside Bluetooth with full A2DP, and integrated 3G broadband — though you’ll have to sort out your own network supplier. The full 82-key QWERTY keyboard is a 90% version of that found on the larger Vaio TT. There’s even integrated GPS, though one has to wonder a bit about that one.

With the standard battery you’ll get around 4 hours of life, and there’s an 8-hour extended battery too. There’s also an SD/MMC card slot, Sony’s standard MemoryStick slot and a webcam with unspecified resolution.

All in all, you can see that this really is a miniature notebook. Its screen looks ideal for watching a movie while you’re on a flight, and the fact that it runs Vista and has 3G broadband and a decent keyboard means you could consider it as an ultraportable business option. The one sticking point, as suspected, is its price: When it goes on sale it’ll be a cool $900.

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Not a netbook then. But its unusual format, high specs and lack of trackpad almost puts it in a new class, a bit like the MacBook Air did for ultraportables last year.

[Sony]

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