The 6th Annual Fast 50

You hoped this day was coming.

Eventually, someone was going to step up and actually start doing something about the state of the world. You might have thought it would be a president—a senator, maybe—who would stand, point out at the future, and raise the alarm. Instead, it is business, and more specifically a certain strain of imaginative, entrepreneurial business, that has found the upside in addressing global malfunction. Whether old-line, established companies or tiny startups, they're tweaking old technologies and inventing startling new ones, tackling everything from pandemics to ancient scourges like hunger. Are they doing all this because they want to save the world, or because they can turn a profit? Yes. And not a moment too soon.

* And one note for the literal-minded: This is a list, not a ranking. In this gallery of imagination, No. 1 gets no more laurels than No. 50.

2
[  Psiphon ]
4
[  Vodacom ]
5
7
8
[  Oxitec ]
9
[  Nike ]
10
11
12
[  Steelcase ]
13
14
[  SunEdison ]
15
16
19
[  EcoFish ]
20
[  Greenfit ]
21
[  Zelfo ]
23
24
[  Terracom ]
25
[  GAIN ]
26
[  Home Depot ]
27
[  Ikea ]
28
29
30
32
34
[  CIVA ]
37
39
40
43
44
47
48
50

Business 3.0
The oblivious capitalist's days are numbered.

Q&A: C.K. Prahalad - Pyramid Schemer
Three years ago, C.K. Prahalad unearthed the "fortune at the bottom of the pyramid." It is, he says, still very real.

Q&A: Pierre Omidyar - Empower Seller
Pierre Omidyar's network funds both nonprofits and for-profits. No matter, as long as they do good.

Q&A: Arnold Schwarzenegger - The Germinator
The former Mr. Universe is flexing his muscle as governor of California, incentivizing business to solve climate change and other weighty problems.

2007 Fast 50: Reader Favorites
We were looking for innovative talents and you all responded with hundreds of submissions and thousands of commments. Here is our list of reader favorites—the submissions that drew the highest marks.

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