Issue 27

September 1999

  • What are your expectations five years from now? As the 21st century arrives, are you feeling confident about your career and sure of your future?

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  • Thirty years ago, hardly anyone understood the question, "What color is your parachute?" Today, it's the job hunter's mantra. Richard Bolles reckons with what has changed in the world of careers -- and, perhaps more important, what hasn't.

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  • General Peter Schoomaker sees a new world of crisis and conflict that requires "creative solutions in ambiguous circumstances." His assignment: the recruitment and training of a new kind of problem-solving, combat-ready "warrior diplomat."

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  • If you want to capture people's attention -- during a presentation or while chatting on a plane -- you have to give a great performance. Actress Martha Burgess teaches theater techniques to businesspeople.

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  • Take a course at Startup U. Recent graduates of Brown founded CDNow, Nantucket Nectars, and Motley Fool. What's their secret? a 67-year-old professor who shows them the entrepreneurial ropes.

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  • Even the new economy's bold thinkers, knowledge workers, and team players need to be on time.

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  • One of the world's most powerful advertising executives, Martin Sorrell, offers a provocative set of ideas about doing business around the world. His biggest worry: "It's all too easy to get out of touch with what's really going on."

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  • Work in three acts: our players fret about being acquired, wrestle with their roles, and decide whether to be stars -- or to make their exits.

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  • The Web has become a feast for the ears as well as the eyes. You can listen in on conference calls with Wall Street analysts, get breaking news from the Balkans, or download the latest tune from Fatboy Slim. Here's Fast Company's listener's guide.

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  • Getting into business school is the easy part. Now comes the hard part: hardwiring your personal tool kit of learning technologies. Here's what to pack.

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  • Anita Borg is a living legend among computer scientists. She is also leading a worldwide movement to redesign the relationship between women and technology. Some of the world's most powerful technology companies are finally paying attention.

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  • 2Bridge Software www.2bridge.com
    AltiGen www.altigen.com
    American Century www.americancentury.com
    American Electric Power www.aep.com
    American Express Financial Advisors www.americanexpress.com/advisors
    American Express Small Business www.americanexpress.com
    AmeriSuites www.amerisuites.com
    Andersen Consulting www.ac.com
    Anderson School at UCLA www.anderson.ucla.edu
    Andrew Marc www.andrewmarc.com
    AppNet www.appnet.com
    AT&T www.att.com
    Audi A4 www.audiusa.com
    Brooks Brothers www.brooksbrothers.com

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  • It's new! It's radical! It's digital! And it's designed for you. That's the pitch from a hot new crop of books on marketing. Together, they amount to a cutting-edge curriculum for connecting with customers.

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  • Context Integration is a fast-growing company with lots of bright ideas -- and a Web-based knowledge network to test, track, capture, and share those ideas.

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  • How I learned to strap on my chute, jump out of a plane, miss the drop zone, and call it "fun." (Hey, it beats sitting in a cubicle!)

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  • How do Web companies get so big so fast? By embracing the most important strategic mind flip of the 21st century. A world governed by networks is rewriting the rules for how you build companies, market products, and create value.

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  • Australia's Lend Lease Corp. is responsible for some of the world's most spectacular buildings. It's also a leader in mutual funds, computer services, and other far-flung lines of business.

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  • Chumbo.com sells software on the Web -- 15,000 titles from nearly 500 companies. But its "killer app" is reinventing how the software industry works. "We want to give people a richer retail experience."

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  • As we head toward Y2K on skis, snowboards, bikes, and skates, the people at K2 -- a top-of-the-line recreational equipment company -- treat their island headquarters as a totally integrated, indoor-outdoor laboratory.

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