Issue 128

September 2008


Now

  • Listen: Songs of Autumn

    Think of MTV's Video Music Awards (September 7) as the kickoff for the jam-packed fall-release season. Can any of these noteworthy albums help the music biz buck its recent blues?

  • Reflection: A Century of the Automobile Industry

    September 2008 is a milestone month for U.S. automakers: General Motors and the Ford Model T both turn 100 years old. We wish they had more to celebrate, but in their honor, here's a look at the business of cars.

  • The Business of Cars

    September 2008 is a milestone month for U.S. automakers: General Motors and the Ford Model T both turn 100 years old. We wish they had more to celebrate, but in their honor, here's a look at the business of cars.

Next

  • Quiksilver's Spice Girls

    The struggling sportswear company tries to jump-start its new women's clothing line -- and a turnaround -- by sponsoring a "team" of creatives.

  • The Simemperor

    Sims creator Will Wright, whose new life-spawning game Spore comes out this month, talks about what's wrong with Grand Theft Auto, the dearth of women in gaming, and the value of his empire.

  • Forces of Nature

    Renzo Piano's California Academy of Sciences is a home for flora and fauna -- and a feat of engineering.

  • The Success of Kayak.com

    Steve Hafner has built Kayak into the most popular Web 2.0 travel site. How it flies as the airline industry suffers.

  • Power Play

    Activist-turned-entrepreneur Paul Fenn's effort to bring affordable sustainable energy to California could be revolutionary -- and electricity giant PG&E isn't happy about it at all.

Fast Talk

Columns

From the Editor

  • Editor's Letter: Natural Wonder

    A reader wrote in recently to complain about the volume of green-related coverage in Fast Company. I feel obliged to respond.

    Our editorial priority is not to pursue an environmental agenda. We are committed to highlighting innovative businesses and inspiring businesspeople who conceive and execute creative solutions to complex problems. This issue's articles about MySpace, sports doctor James Andrews, and D.C. public-schools chancellor Michelle Rhee are prime examples.