Fast Company

Aesthetic Intelligence: A Leadership Capacity

Introduction to Blog

This is a place to explore the emergent field of Organizational Aesthetics and the capacity, Aesthetic Intelligence. To date, artistic metaphors and methods have been employed by business to dramatize culture, instigate imagination, enhance teamwork, and challenge traditional models of leadership. But there is more the world of business can learn from the world of the arts, beyond metaphor and method. Some of the topics to be explored are: Artistic Mindset which enables business to apply artistic sensibilities to daily and strategic behavior and process; Aesthetic Intelligence, a capacity defined by presence, authenticity and the ability to synthesize; Artful Conversation, interaction which chips away at entrenched ways of thinking, being and doing. This blog will encourage dialogue to explore the possibilities of Organizational Aesthetics, and discuss ways of developing and embedding Aesthetic Intelligence for individuals and organizations, large and small.

Aesthetic Intelligence, A Leadership Capacity

Aesthetic Intelligence, a capacity that defines the underpinnings of the world of the arts, emerged from my work with several theatre ensembles and my collaboration with Constance Goodwin. Aesthetic in this context refers to the full use of all of our senses, including the undeniable, 6th sense. The fundamental elements of Aesthetic Intelligence are presence (in the moment, available, accessible), authenticity (drawing on oneself to assume the role one needs to respond to the person, situation and topic at that time) ,and synthesis (absorbing and assimilating what is happening (intrinsic/extrinsic) and responding in the moment.  This is a brief explanation, but I am curious....What do you think? How does this play out in what you know and what you experience with leadership?

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1 Comments

  • Kenneth Goodwin

    Interested in studying the topic of organizational aesthetics as it impacts educational institutions (interesting, I feel, the use of the word "institution", which rather describes the prison-like nature of schools), so I welcome any information relevant to the topic.